Sjögren’s Syndrome — Current Treatment and Research in Progress

Sjögren’s Syndrome — Treatment

There is no cure yet for Sjögren’s syndrome. As is typical with other autoimmune diseases, the severity of Sjögren’s can vary from person to person. Many patients experience a mild disease that affects not only the eyes but also the mouth. Over time, though, other individuals may develop additional symptoms of variable severity. Alternatively, for other people, the condition may improve and sometimes even go into remission. Unfortunately a few Sjögren’s sufferers eventually exhibit severe and chronic (long-term) symptoms.

Current treatments focus on managing the symptoms. Moisture replacement therapies, for example, help to relieve dryness. Similarly nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can sometimes control inflammation. People with severe Sjögren’s syndrome may receive corticosteroids, which mimic hormones that fight inflammation in the body, or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), which suppress the body’s overextended immune response.

An experienced healthcare team can determine the best combination of over-the-counter treatments, prescription medications and medical procedures for any individual situation. Some Sjögren’s patients have found additional relief using environmental modifications together with holistic/herbal approaches such as diet management, exercise, progressive relaxation, Traditional Chinese Medicine, acupuncture and other mind-body techniques.

While it is true that Sjögren’s syndrome can affect the entire body, a Sjögren’s sufferer should not automatically assume that Sjögren’s is the cause every time a different symptom pops up. The best course of action with a new or significant physical change is to consult with the medical caregiver. Usually a physician or other qualified professional can help determine the actual cause of any troublesome symptoms. Then the healthcare team can go to work and find the best treatment for each of them.

Sjögren’s Syndrome — Research and Clinical Trials

Research is currently underway searching in various directions for new medications, therapies and diagnostic tools to improve treatment of Sjögren’s syndrome.

Recommendation: in summary, use this information in conjunction with advice from your health care professionals.

 

 
Below are links that may help you find appropriate clinical trials in your local area:

 

 
ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry of federally and privately supported clinical trials conducted in the United States and around the world. Here you will find information about the objective of each trial, requirements for participation, locations and contact information for more details.
http://www.clinicaltrials.gov

 

 

 
CenterWatch.com includes a Clinical Trial Listing Service, which provides unbiased information on clinical trials with a database that contains thousands of currently-enrolling studies. Information on drugs and new medical therapies is also available to review here along with health and educational resources.

http://www.centerwatch.com

 

 
Ora is the largest independent eye research and development firm in the world. It is currently working with multiple global pharmaceutical companies to find better dry eye treatments.
http://www.eyedrop.com/study_participants/upcoming_studies/template.aspx?ekfrm=134

 

Sjögren’s Syndrome — More Information Sources

For additional up-to-date information the following sites may be helpful:

The official U. S. government information website about Sjögren’s syndrome and its treatment can be accessed from the National Institutes of Health:

http://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info

 

Founded in 1983, the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation provides patients with practical information and coping strategies. In addition the Foundation also serves as a clearinghouse for medical information and advocates on the national level for Sjögren’s sufferers.

https://www.sjogrens.org/

Brand-Daroff Exercises

Brand-Daroff Exercises

We’ve talked about maneuvers and exercises that help remedy vertigo symptoms before.The Epley and Semont maneuvers are popular for their efficacy in treating Meniere’s disease. As part of a multi-pronged approach, they are an effective treatment method. Doctors may combine these techniques with medications and other remedies. These exercises can ease symptoms, especially when paired with other medical intervention. A more balanced life is within reach for most patients who do Brand-Daroff excercises.

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A New Solution to Cure Vertigo

A New Solution to Cure Vertigo

You can stand up and remain stable when you walk, run or dance thanks to your inner ears. They have a complex and delicate system. Inside the ear there are sensitive bulbs, fluid-filled coils and minute hairs. Special membranes coat each hair. Each time you move your head, microscopic crystals on the membranes, tug on the hairs. This relays information through the inner ear and on to nerves which send the info to the brain. Because this system is so delicate, many things can go wrong. Viral infections, trauma and chronic conditions like Meniere’s disease can disrupt inner ear balance. When something does go wrong in the inner ear, it can lead to vertigo.

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What you Need to Know About Dizziness and Balance

What you Need to Know About Dizziness and Balance

If it wasn’t for your natural balance system, you wouldn’t be able to move without falling over. A series of signals passing to your brain from your eyes, inner ear, skin and muscles dictate balance.

If you begin to experience sudden loss or balance to dizziness go to see your doctor. You will need emergency medical care if you experience:

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Home Remedies for Vertigo

Home Remedies for Vertigo

It’s not easy living with vertigo. It’s also known as Meniere’s disease, and is the byproduct of poor inner ear balance. Aside from dizziness, there are other symptoms associated with Meniere’s. They include nausea, shaky hands, profuse sweating, eye movement, and a loss of orientation. It’s no easy affliction to live with, and it can cause quite a bit of discomfort among sufferers.

It’s not just an inconvenience, either. Meniere’s can pose a significant risk to one’s well-being and safety. Imagine getting dizzy and losing your bearing while driving, or operating machinery. Episodes, or short bursts of time when symptoms flare up, can last between 20 seconds and four hours. Vertigo can be life-threatening.

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What Triggers Vertigo Attacks?

What Triggers Vertigo Attacks?

One of the toughest aspects of living with any disease or condition is dealing with triggers. Triggers are best explained as cues that lead to the onset of symptoms. In a simplified example, imagine the color yellow as a trigger. In the case of Meniere’s, you could exhibit worsening symptoms of vertigo from it. Triggers are often more complicated than colors, but they can be just as commonplace.

The medical and scientific communities know what triggers vertigo attacks. But only to a degree. Like many illnesses, Meniere’s disease is not one that we know everything about. Though it’s been around a long time, there’s plenty we don’t know about Vertigo.

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10 Surprising Facts About Dizziness and Vertigo

10 Surprising Facts About Dizziness and Vertigo

Dizziness is a common condition among adults. In some cases, it can escalate to vertigo, which is a more severe condition. Vertigo affects almost 40% of people over the age of 40 years, at least once in their lifetime.

Both dizziness and vertigo have a close relationship. Their causes are known, but sometimes these causes can be surprising.

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Take Action Against Vertigo

Take Action Against Vertigo

According to research, 40% of people over age 40 will experience vertigo at least once in their life. This data is a confirmation that more work is needed on how to stop vertigo.

Vertigo occurs when some parts of the ear cannot communicate to the brain. The cause: injuries, ear infections, aging, inflammation, or a blow to the head. However, those working on how to stop vertigo have some remedies. Vertigo medications help in easing the vomiting and nausea while some reduce dizziness. In most cases, physicians identify the condition behind vertigo and advise on treatment. As medicine grapples with how to stop vertigo, some methods have proven successful.

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What is Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo?

What is Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo?

At least 20% of vertigo patients have BPPV (benign paroxysmal positional vertigo). It is one of the most common causes of vertigo in the U.S.

BPPV is an abnormal sensation of motion. It is caused by changes in head position that alter head orientation in relation to gravity. These changes include:

  • Lying down
  • Looking up at a high shelf
  • Getting in or out of bed
  • Tipping your head up or down
  • Sitting up from a lying position
  • Turning over while sleeping
  • Other quick head movements

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Do-it-Yourself Vertigo Treatments

Do-it-Yourself Vertigo Treatments

These do-it-yourself vertigo treatments will help prevent and get you through bouts of dizziness. These tips are so easy, anyone can do them!

Take a Deep Breath

Deep breathing provides the brain with enough oxygen. It also relaxes the nervous system. There are instances where you may feel dizzy because you are not breathing well.

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